Browsing articles tagged with " Facebook"

Career Success in Turbulent Times: Join Me Today 1PM ET for #PASSProfDev VC Webinar

Sep 22, 2011   //   by Karen Lopez   //   Blog, Data, Professional Development, Social Networking, Speaking  //  No Comments

HeadshotTwoGradientThis afternoon I’m presenting at the Professional Association for SQL Server (PASS) Professional Development virtual chapter.  My topic today is about how to ensure that you are doing the right things now to support job and project search efforts when you need them.  Join me at 1PM EDT

 

 

 

A workshop on issues and ideas that today’s data professionals can do to build their careers and networking skills with other data management professionals.

Workshop topics will include:
• Demonstrating your expertise
• Building a portfolio of your success stories
• Getting others to sell your skills and business value
• Building & extending your data management skill set
• 10 Steps to highlighting you and your work

Bring your thoughts, ideas, and experiences.

As a virtual presentation, I’ll be relying heavily on Q&A from the audience, as well as input from Twitter to ensure that this is the most interactive it can be.  Please join us as we talk about how we as a profession can best ensure that we are all working and our projects have the right resources to be successful.

The hashtag to use during this talk is #PASSProfDev

A recording of the presentation should be available on 24 Sept 2011 at http://prof-dev.sqlpass.org/ .

We had great interaction for a Live Meeting. Great job, everyone.

Are You Sitting at the Table: Why We Have Too Few Women Leaders

Aug 3, 2011   //   by Karen Lopez   //   Blog, Professional Development, Speaking, WIT  //  No Comments

Sheryl Sandberg is the COO of Facebook.  I first saw Sheryl talk on a Women in IT (WIT) panel that happened during the recent Facebook Townhall.  Steve Jones (blog | Twitter) sent me this link as he knows I have a passion for WIT topics and discussions. I found myself nodding with agreement to what Ms. Sandberg addresses in this 15 minute video.  In one of the points, she shares stories of women who don’t "sit at the table".  I noticed behaviour throughout my career.  You’ve all been to large meetings where there weren’t enough seats at the conference table, so some people have to sit along the wall or at the back of the room.  In most cases, women will choose to sit away from the table in one of the "wallflower" seats.  I’m not sure why this happens.  I suspect it’s how we were raised to be nice, take the burnt cookie, choose the least comfortable chair, or otherwise put someone else’s needs ahead of our own.  There’s nothing wrong with giving up your seat for someone who needs it more than you do, but we ladies need to stop deferring our power to others because we aren’t thinking like the men are. 

I’ve heard that the most powerful seat in a room is one that faces the main entrance.  I almost never see my female co-workers take that seat.  Maybe they don’t know where the power seats are.  Maybe they don’t care to play the game.  Maybe they don’t feel they are worthy of it.  I can assure you that there are people in the room playing that game and they are keeping score.  It’s not just this one small behaviour, either.  We females spend too much time as wallflowers in all kinds of situations:  not submitting to speak at events and conferences, giving others credit for our own work, letting people in meetings shut down our comments.  I’ve seen all of them. 

In the Facebook Townhall, President Obama first spoke with Mark Zuckerberg, then after all that was done, a panel of women in tech discussed diversity and gender issues. What I found odd about this set up was that it almost sent the same message that Sheryl addresses in the above TED Talk: Sitting at the table. When I first read the agenda for the townhall, I was thrilled that the President of the United States was going to discuss a topic that was near and dear to my heart. Instead, the WIT panel was held as separate event on a different set. I was thrilled that such a high profile event covered the topic of gender issues in technology, though, and I look forward to future events where this issue can be addressed with the widest possible audiences.

Watch the video.  In 15 minutes Sheryl gives 3 pieces of advice that can benefit you in your career.  Keep asking yourself, "am I sitting at the table"? 

I’m Speaking: DAMA PDX – 24 Feb – Industry Standard Data Models + Career Success

Feb 24, 2011   //   by Karen Lopez   //    //  1 Comment
Don Valley Golf Course

Image by Karen Lopez via Flickr

I’m going to be doing TWO presentations at DAMA Portland (OR) on Thursday, 24 February.  I so very much love visiting Portland and the members of this DAMA group are great for engaging and inspiring conversations during the presentations.

The topics I’m covering:


Career Success in Data Management during Turbulent Times

A workshop on issues and ideas that today’s data architects and modelers can do to build their careers and networking skills with other data management professionals.

Workshop topics will include:
• Demonstrating your expertise
• Building a portfolio of your success stories
• Getting others to sell your skills and business value
• Building & extending your data management skill set
• 10 Steps to highlighting you and your work

Bring your thoughts, ideas, and experiences.


This presentation talks about how to get others to help sell your skills, how networking (talking to people, not passing out business cards) can help you advance your project and your skills, and how to having a portfolio of great career data can help you demonstrate your professional abilities.


Starting with More than a Blank Page: Modeling with an Industry Standard Data Model

Have you ever considered using pre-existing pattern models to jump start your data modeling projects?  Have you considered purchasing proprietary models? Did you know that there are hundreds of models available to you for free or for minimal cost?

Many industry trade associations publish industry standard data models (ISDMs).  These models focus on the core and supporting business functions associated with retailing, health care, criminal justice and other industry sectors.  They may be provided free to the public or for just the cost of joining a trade association.

In this presentation, Karen discusses some of the benefits and gotchas of working with acquired models – industry standard models, patterns, and other universal model concepts.   This session includes topics such as:

  • The costs, benefits, and risks of working with industry standard data models
  • The benefits of using industry standards in your package acquisition projects
  • Choosing the right process
  • Myths in working with pattern models
  • 10 Tips for successfully working with third party models
  • What you should know before committing to project plans and estimates
  • Lessons Learned
  • Resources

Find out what other organizations are doing with industry standard data models — how vendors and industry organizations are partnering to set standards that your organization will want to leverage for better meet the business needs of your solutions.


I’ve added some more live examples of industry standard data models (ARTS and NIEM) to this presentation to help demonstrate typical data models that are prepared for industry-specific examples.

I hope you can join me in Portland.

Cost

Free for members!
$15 for non-members.
See the list of corporate members.

RSVP

at DAMA-PDX website by noon Friday, February 22, 2011

Webcast Recording Available: Why Be Normal? CA ERwin Modeling User Group

Dec 8, 2010   //   by Karen Lopez   //   Blog, Data, Data Modeling, Database, Social Networking, Speaking  //  No Comments

As I blogged last week, I participated in a webcast on social networking for data management professionals.  That webcast was recorded and is now available for viewing.

https://www305.livemeeting.com/cc/cai/view?id=C9336C&role=attend&pw=cP}3%22PW4Q

Handouts of the slides I presented on the cost, benefits and risks of social networking are also available.

Handouts for OEMUG / CA Global Modeling User Group Why Be Normal Webcast

If you are reading my blog and on any of these social networks, I’d love to friend/follow/link to you. My contact information for those services are in the handouts. If you do send me a request, please mention that you are a blog reader, attended an event I presented at, or where we met.

Why Be Normal: New CA Event with Badges

Dec 1, 2010   //   by Karen Lopez   //    //  3 Comments

image CA is organizing a community building, social networking program for data management professionals.  Why Be Normal plays on the normalization theme by awarding virtual badges to those who engage in CA ERwin Data Modeler –related online communities.

So far I’ve attained Second Normal Form (2NF) by ensuring that I have accounts on the CA user communities, attended a webcast (I’ve even presented a couple), answered some questions on their ERwin discussion forum, and provided my Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn posts where I’ve posted about CA ERwin Data Modeler.

You may know from my previous posts that I’m a huge fan of social networking for all the benefits it has given me.  I know that the data management community is still a bit cautious about what these things are all about, but I see them as valuable as the e-mail based online communities that I’ve been a big fan of for more than a decade.

To kick off the Why Be Normal promotion, I’ll be speaking on a panel at the Ohio Enterprise Modeling User Group on 1 December 2010 about social networking for the ERwin community. While the OEMUG meeting is an all day event, there will be a one hour webcast at 11 AM ET about the Why Be Normal program.  You can join us to learn about the prizes and badges.

Why Be Normal? Social Networking and the ERwin Community

Join us on December 1 at 11:00 a.m. Eastern for this informative webcast hosted by Tom Bilcze, Modeling Global User Communities, President with panelists: Karen Lopez, InfoAdvisors, Sr. Project Manager and Principal Consultant; Donna Burbank, CA Technologies, CA ERwin Modeling, Product Marketing and Rob Rachlin, CA Technologies, Principal, Customer Programs.

In this webcast, panelists discuss social networking from an ERwin data professional perspective. Facebook, InfoAdvisors, LinkedIn, Twitter, My CA, ERwin.com, and data-centric tool social networks offer many options for you to join a virtual data community. If you are new to social networking, a seasoned tweeter, or just want to use social networking more efficiently, this webcast is ideal for you.

I’d love it if you would join us on 1 December to talk about how we can leverage these social networking platforms for the ERwin user community.

Twitter: How Has It Made You Better at Your Job?

Nov 29, 2010   //   by Karen Lopez   //   Blog, Social Networking  //  4 Comments

One of the issues I struggle with in getting people to understand why I tweet is demonstrating the value of engaging with others to people who haven’t engaged on Twitter.  Yes, it’s a Catch-22

I have read that the majority of the people who sign up for Twitter (and other social networks) create an account, post something like “I have an account”, the sit back and wait for all the magic to come their way.  But these networks don’t work that way.  The benefits I’ve realized  don’t happen because I broadcast a message but because I’ve had very brief conversations with smart people like you from all over the world. 

Yes, I do tend to post some personal items like the pictures of odd or funny things I’ve seen in my day, but for the most part I’m on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn for professional reasons.  Sure, I appreciate the parking space that Noel and Tamara donated to me, the collection of postal packages that Yanni and John provided and a nice spot to sleep this week at Erin’s place, but those came because I had already engaged with these people prior to asking for help.

Located between snippets of fun are my DB2, SQL Server, WordPress and a myriad of other technical questions and answers I received from the Twitterverse.  Sometimes from existing contacts and sometimes from strangers.

Before the network of networks I could have done my best to interpret vague documentation, called the tool vendor, called one person who I think worked with these technologies, or found a forum and posted my question.  I still do those, but 9 times out of 10 an answer comes back from a social network long before these other resources had time to respond.

My ability to reach out to ask if anyone is using feature X of product Z, to ask for opinions of the best way to accomplish Y or if anyone knows the best place to get a dead car fixed(Chicago, 2010) has helped my clients and me respond faster, with better answers than ever before.

What have you told not-yet-ready-for-prime-time people about why they should be blogging, Tweeting, posting to Facebook, etc. for their professional lives?  What would be the best way to demonstrate the resources available to them?

First Rule of Branding: Grab it!

Nov 19, 2010   //   by Karen Lopez   //   Blog, Professional Development, Social Networking  //  1 Comment

The MidnightDBAs (or is it just Jen?) have declared today as an Un-SQL Friday.  Nope, this isn’t a NoSQL Friday post, but a “not about SQL” Friday post.

Your mission: To write about branding. We have spoken to a LOT of people in the past two weeks about branding, often specifically about our brand, and the thoughts they are a-churnin.  Your blog should reflect however that word strikes you – whether it’s in personal/professional branding, software branding, our brand, product brands, or whatever.

We recently switched our branding back to “love your data” and away from “adding value to your information resources”.  We still think our former tagline is true, but Love Your Data is much more fun and still reinforces the need to take good care of your data.

So I was going to write about the value of brand, or how to protect your brand when I realized that the First Rule of Branding is to go reserve (grab) that brand, or the closest you can to it.  I’m @datachick on Twitter not because I think having a made-up Twitter ID is fun or cool, but because having a common name like “Lopez” means that every form of my name that I could come up with was already taken.  Not all of the combinations are being used, but they are already snatched up by people who may not ever use them. But because they were registered, they aren’t available to me.

I have a similar issue on Facebook.  My Facebook id is “lopezk” That’s closer to something real, but still not instantly recognizable, memorable or conversation friendly.

Now with LinkedIn I was an early adopter and I was also paying attention when the call for setting up your own personal link was announced and I managed to snag “karenlopez

Heck, even on the Xbox Live system I thought for sure I could get some form of my name or Datachick, but even all the easy to remember forms for Datachick were already taken. So there I’m “DatachickXbox”.  Just like I’m my own gaming device.

On our own discussion lists I was also able to set up an ID of “karenlopez“, but that’s because I was the first user on the system.

KarenAvatarLargeSo you can see what’s happened: I have several brands or IDs for myself scattered all over the Internet.  I can sometimes relate them to my brand by using the same avatar or the same logo or just to put them up together on one slide.  But I really wish that I could have my same brand everywhere.  By having a common name and joining late, I missed out on having a common brand for me personally.

In fact, on Twitter there are two other people who probably weren’t happy to find out that Datachick was already taken, so they came up with Datachix1 and Datachix2.  Now the brand is even further diluted and confusing.

So don’t wait to grab those brands where you can.  Even if you name is one of only two people with that name on the planet.  You never know when that other guy is going to grab “your” brand.

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