Browsing articles tagged with " Community"

The Discussion Groups are Closing

Frequent postersI’ve been posting about this for the last few years and I’ve finally carved out some time during my staycation to decommission our discussion group servers.  This is long overdue, I know.  But like any caring ListMistress, it’s been hard to say “it’s time”. It’s about 5 years past time, actually.

I know that some of you have expressed an interested in having me just continue to host these with no updates.  But the technology the WebBoard software runs on is too old and out of support to do so.  While there have been several physical servers over the years (starting with just mailing list software running on a PC in my basement), the vendor of the most recent software has been out of business for more than seven years.  The software was running last on Windows 2003 and SQL Server 2000.  And while I could likely install the software on an updated server, the installation process for this application requires a call home to a mothership that has long left the universe. So that’s not an option.  There are also other considerations in that the original vendor took no steps to make the software very security-mindful and that has always bothered me.

The server (and database) I’m decommissioning today was put into production in 1998.  Clinton was having a bad year, the International Space Station was just being built and InfoAdvisors had been incorporated for about a year.

Looking Back

I wish I had time to sort through some of our posts to see what the most fun, debatable or encouraging ones were.  But what I do remember is that we built a community of data professionals who worked to make sure that everyone else working in the data field had the right resources to be successful.  I will keep my database backup around and might spend some time rooting through it to find some gems.  If you have some memories you’d like to share, please do so in the comments below.

we built a community of data professionals who worked to make sure that everyone else working in the data field had the right resources to be successful.

Many of you were just lurkers, reading the content, occasionally asking for help (printing with ERwin, getting macros to work in ER/Studio, figuring out what the heck a conceptual model is, etc.)  But some of you did wonderful things by answering so many posts and providing user-to-user support to help others get stuff done (image shows some of our most frequent posters).  And some of you came for the debate. You know who you are.

Data

I thought I’d share some stats with you about our community. Not all of these were data boards, but since our non-data ones were trivial, I’m not going to bother filtering out. While we’ve archived a great deal of content over the decades. And, again, this is data active on the server right now, not over the entire life of our communities.

Registered Users:  10,175

Boards: 15

Forums: 126

Messages: 326,013

Attachments: 2,086

Boards

These also were adjusted over the years, but we hosted communities for:

Casewise Corporate Modeler

Data Modeling (various boards)

DBartisan

ER/Studio

ERwin

IT Methods

Other Data Modeling Tools (various boards)

Platinum Repository

PowerDesigner

Rational/InfoSphere Data Architect

Silverrun

Visible Analyst

Zachman Framework

Moderators

Unlike almost all other online communities, we actively moderated every post to our boards.  That means that a human being read every post to ensure it was on topic and not spam.  We could have not have done that without the help of our volunteer moderators:

Rick Davis

Rob Drysdale

Scot Fearnside

Garry Gramm

Jeremy Janzen

Carol Lehn

Ray McGlew

Fran Palmeri

Karel Vetrovsky

Many of us are still active on other boards and social media.  You should reach out to them and say thanks.  They made this all happen.

What’s Next?

I looked at web-based discussion software for my blog.  I may still install some, but they all miss the feature that I really want – Email and web-based discussions, all integrated.  The other issue is that there are now so many places on the web with data-focused discussions that I’m not sure standing up another one will add much value.

Here are some of the places you can go to get some data modeling community vibes:

http://community.embarcadero.com 

http://Erwin.com

http://scn.sap.com/community/powerdesigner

There are also the usual internet locations of LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter.  But most of these are, let’s be candid, full of spam.  I can’t really recommend any single source there.

I’m also still the moderator of dm-discuss on Yahoo Groups.  I suggest you join that group if you are looking for vendor-independent discussions about data management and modeling.

Thank you!

I ran the infrastructure for these online communities, but you, readers and sometimes posters, delivered the content, which was the most important part. I’m hanging up my ListMistress tiara and using my Twitter to influence IT professionals to love their data now.   I encourage you to find some non-data oriented communities and start influencing them to think about data, too.  Then join some of the data ones and start helping each other, too. 

I’m still here, still loving data.  It’s just the server that is moving to a farm where it can play with other servers.  I hope to see you in one these other communities.

So Long, and Thanks for All the Data

Karen
ListMistress (ret.)

Strutting: We all Know When You are Doing It. So Stop.

Jun 25, 2014   //   by Karen Lopez   //   Blog, DLBlog  //  1 Comment

Rant Level: High. It’s Friday. 

Kanye West Ruins Taylor Swift's VMAs Win

 

I was reading an ACM blog post by Judy Robertson about strutting, a tactic used by audience members at event.  Robertson discusses a specific type of this behaviour, done by IT people: nerd strutting

Garvin-Doxas and Barker (2004) refer to "strutting" as a style of interaction where people show off their knowledge by asking questions carefully designed to demonstrate that they know a lot about the topic, and quite possibly that they know more than everyone else around them. The problem with this in a learning situation is that students who lack confidence assume that they are the only person who doesn’t understand, and quickly feel even more demoralised.

The full paper is available if you’d like to read about the study these researchers did on Defensive Climate in the Computer Science Classroom.

I’m betting you’ve seen this behaviour before.  In fact, I’d bet that if you attend enough events, you could name the people most likely to nerd strut before the speaker has even gotten 15 minutes into her presentation.  They ask questions, often sprinkled with references to product codenames, Greek philosophers, small startups and archaic error numbers.   They use highly jargonized terms.  They use insider terms. They want you to feel outside the inner circle.  They want you to know just how freaking smart they are.  But you know what’s funny?  The vast majority of the people in the room can see what they are doing and silently smirk.   

I’m interested in hearing just what sorts of people fall for this bravado.  Everyone else in the room talks about how insanely annoying the behaviour is, but no one wants to do anything about it.  I’m not even sure what we can do about it, other than to ask audience members to stop.  

Insults R Us

Another tactic that nerd strutters do is sit in the audience and stage whisper criticisms of the speaker and the topics.  I find this incredibly annoying as an audience member.  It doesn’t impress me, nor does it make me feel as if the strutmaster is actually convincing anyone he is superior. A variation of this is a group of people, chatting with each other and loudly snickering about the speaker or the topic.   

If you are sitting in a presentation and you find it too "level 100” for your tastes, you should just get up and find a presentation more fitting for your enormous brain…or whatever body part is keeping you from learning anything.

Why it Matters

I know, some of you are saying “But Karen, just ignore the @$$#@+s that do this stuff”.  I do, mostly.  However, Garvin-Doxas and Barker found that the effect of many types of negative communication, even when it was not intended, has a negative impact on many students, especially women.  Yes, women should suck it up and learn to play the game of competition.  But we don’t do it that well.  In general, women prefer a collaborative environment.   We love a bit of friendly competition. But one where team members insult others in public? Not so much.

The authors point to the fact that IT work is highly collaborative.  Supporting and enabling a culture of jabs, insults, mockery and distain works against that goal.  I hear people constantly ranting that topic X should not be on a conference agenda because it is isn’t what *they* want  learn.  I say “choose another session – there are several other tracks”.  When I see someone nerd strut in front of an entire audience, I want to call them out – tell them they are showing off.  We can all tell when a question isn’t really a question. I don’t call people out on this, though, because no one else does.

What to Do

Robertson gives 3 tips in her blog post on dealing with nerd strutting.  Go read them.  I’d love to see the community deal with this in a consistent, collaborative way.

I’d like to add to them:

1. Encourage others to ask questions during presentations.  One of the reasons why many nerd strutters can do what they do, often several times in the same session, is that very few people ask questions or give commentary.  If enough people are asking legitimate questions, then the strutters get less show time.

2. Ask the Insult R Us people to take their conversation elsewhere. It’s annoying enough to hear anyone ramble on while you are trying to listen to the speaker.  It’s not rude or unfair to ask people, no matter what they are talking about, to either be quiet or to wander somewhere else.

3. Stand up to people who insult the work of others.  This one is the biggest pet peeve of mine.  It’s fine for people to be proud of their own work.  It’s not cool for them to insult the work of others just because they think it’s easy or low-level stuff. I don’t just draw boxes and lines all day.  BI professionals don’t just draw bar charts all day.  Developers don’t just type all day.  We all have difficult jobs.  I don’t need to step on someone else to raise myself up.  I will continue to speak out to the people who need to insult others.  I’m hoping you can, too.

Community Impact

From the paper:

Finally, when people communicate certainty in a dogmatic fashion, they also tend to communicate a low tolerance for disagreement. When defensive communication becomes habitual in a social context, it engenders a "defensive climate." Distrust of others becomes the norm, resulting in a social environment privileging competition over cooperation.

We all need to recognize that this negative behaviour hurts everyone.  It poisons the community.  It drives people away, especially new community members and those who want to work together to solve problems and build the community.   And we all need to work together to keep people focused on making the community an inclusive, inviting environment.

Garvin-Doxas, K. and Barker, L. J. 2004. Communication in computer science classrooms: understanding defensive climates as a means of creating supportive behaviors. J. Educ. Resour. Comput. 4, 1 (Mar. 2004), 2. DOI= http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1060071.1060073

.

Strutting: We all Know When You are Doing It. So Stop.

Apr 26, 2013   //   by Karen Lopez   //   Blog, Fun, Snark, Speaking  //  12 Comments

Rant Level: High. It’s Friday. 

Kanye West Ruins Taylor Swift's VMAs Win

 

I was reading an ACM blog post by Judy Robertson about strutting, a tactic used by audience members at event.  Robertson discusses a specific type of this behaviour, done by IT people: nerd strutting

Garvin-Doxas and Barker (2004) refer to "strutting" as a style of interaction where people show off their knowledge by asking questions carefully designed to demonstrate that they know a lot about the topic, and quite possibly that they know more than everyone else around them. The problem with this in a learning situation is that students who lack confidence assume that they are the only person who doesn’t understand, and quickly feel even more demoralised.

The full paper is available if you’d like to read about the study these researchers did on Defensive Climate in the Computer Science Classroom.

I’m betting you’ve seen this behaviour before.  In fact, I’d bet that if you attend enough events, you could name the people most likely to nerd strut before the speaker has even gotten 15 minutes into her presentation.  They ask questions, often sprinkled with references to product codenames, Greek philosophers, small startups and archaic error numbers.   They use highly jargonized terms.  They use insider terms. They want you to feel outside the inner circle.  They want you to know just how freaking smart they are.  But you know what’s funny?  The vast majority of the people in the room can see what they are doing and silently smirk.   

I’m interested in hearing just what sorts of people fall for this bravado.  Everyone else in the room talks about how insanely annoying the behaviour is, but no one wants to do anything about it.  I’m not even sure what we can do about it, other than to ask audience members to stop.  

Insults R Us

Another tactic that nerd strutters do is sit in the audience and stage whisper criticisms of the speaker and the topics.  I find this incredibly annoying as an audience member.  It doesn’t impress me, nor does it make me feel as if the strutmaster is actually convincing anyone he is superior. A variation of this is a group of people, chatting with each other and loudly snickering about the speaker or the topic.   

If you are sitting in a presentation and you find it too "level 100” for your tastes, you should just get up and find a presentation more fitting for your enormous brain…or whatever body part is keeping you from learning anything.

Why it Matters

I know, some of you are saying “But Karen, just ignore the @$$#@+s that do this stuff”.  I do, mostly.  However, Garvin-Doxas and Barker found that the effect of many types of negative communication, even when it was not intended, has a negative impact on many students, especially women.  Yes, women should suck it up and learn to play the game of competition.  But we don’t do it that well.  In general, women prefer a collaborative environment.   We love a bit of friendly competition. But one where team members insult others in public? Not so much.

The authors point to the fact that IT work is highly collaborative.  Supporting and enabling a culture of jabs, insults, mockery and distain works against that goal.  I hear people constantly ranting that topic X should not be on a conference agenda because it is isn’t what *they* want  learn.  I say “choose another session – there are several other tracks”.  When I see someone nerd strut in front of an entire audience, I want to call them out – tell them they are showing off.  We can all tell when a question isn’t really a question. I don’t do call people out on this, though, because no one else does.

What to Do

Robertson gives 3 tips in her blog post on dealing with nerd strutting.  Go read them.  I’d love to see the community deal with this in a consistent, collaborative way.

I’d like to add to them:

1. Encourage others to ask questions during presentations.  One of the reasons why many nerd strutters can do what they do, often several times in the same session, is that very few people ask questions or give commentary.  If enough people are asking legitimate questions, then the strutters get less show time.

2. Ask the Insult R Us people to take their conversation elsewhere. It’s annoying enough to hear anyone ramble on while you are trying to listen to the speaker.  It’s not rude or unfair to ask people, no matter what they are talking about, to either be quiet or to wander somewhere else.

3. Stand up to people who insult the work of others.  This one is the biggest pet peeve of mine.  It’s fine for people to be proud of their own work.  It’s not cool for them to insult the work of others just because they think it’s easy or low-level stuff. I don’t just draw boxes and lines all day.  BI professionals don’t just draw bar charts all day.  Developers don’t just type all day.  We all have difficult jobs.  I don’t need to step on someone else to raise myself up.  I will continue to speak out to the people who need to insult others.  I’m hoping you can, too.

Community Impact

From the paper:

Finally, when people communicate certainty in a dogmatic fashion, they also tend to communicate a low tolerance for disagreement. When defensive communication becomes habitual in a social context, it engenders a "defensive climate." Distrust of others becomes the norm, resulting in a social environment privileging competition over cooperation.

We all need to recognize that this negative behaviour hurts everyone.  It poisons the community.  It drives people away, especially new community members and those who want to work together to solve problems and build the community.   And we all need to work together to keep people focused on making the community an inclusive, inviting environment.

Garvin-Doxas, K. and Barker, L. J. 2004. Communication in computer science classrooms: understanding defensive climates as a means of creating supportive behaviors. J. Educ. Resour. Comput. 4, 1 (Mar. 2004), 2. DOI= http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1060071.1060073

.

Subscribe via E-mail

Use the link below to receive posts via e-mail. Unsubscribe at any time. Subscribe to www.datamodel.com by Email


Categories

Archive

UA-52726617-1